Sunday shore diving, Loch Fyne. 22nd June 2014

“Sunday?”, “Yes, where?”, “OK, When?” Ah, the joys of shore diving ! And so it was that a small group of divers from Perth and Crieff met in Tyndrum before moving off to Furnace on Loch Fyne for a days diving.

Todays venue was Furnace were Dogfish reef was our chosen site offering a both a good scenic dive and a variety of depths to suit. Unfortunately the relationship between divers and the local community has been spoilt by a small and thoughtless minority whose actions have provided offense. The local community is now doing all it can to discourage divers and actively blocks the entrance to the council owner car park making it just that little bit harder to get in the water.

We had the site brief and then made a couple of trips to get the kit down to the water’s edge before the first team were off onto the reef. With a high tide they had a few meters of wall left to play with as they explored the depths of the main reef reporting nudibranchs, sealoch anemones and some very large fish. The second team explored the reef to the right which while not as rocky was still a steep slope leading onto a gravel and rock and then sand. Two sets of 40 minute dives in some very reasonable vis.

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An interesting temperature profile today. The shallows had a balmy 18°C , green and plankton rich which dropped to 8°C at 15m providing clear water and excellent viz, however there were two distinctive patches in the dive where the temperature dropped to 7°C which seemed to be associated with fresh water outfalls from the reef. These made for chilly interludes in otherwise very pleasant conditions.

(Ed- the boot award, goes to Chris who turned up with a half full tank. While he claims it must have leaked in the car, the awards committee thinks this is highly unlikely.)

With such glorious weather it was decided to go and explore another site and with an eye on the clock we opted for Drishaig Reef further up the loch towards the Loch Fyne Oyster Bar. Steve and I had checked the access out previously and thought it was worth a look. We as a club had not dived this site for many years and indeed it was a new one to both Steve and I, though Hamish and Maureen may have previously done it with the ‘Old club’, so we set off in the hope of more scenic surroundings and to find the layby.

Have to report that the walk down the bank from the layby is rather steep and not for the week of knee! However once on the cobbled beach we were quickly in the water and Hamish led the way over sand and onto mud where a forest of slender seapens appeared. Further down the slope we found a nephrops bed, with burrows and the occasional prawn displaying aggressively in the open. Some fantastic specimens of the fireworks anemones appeared iridescent in the gloom. Rather too quickly our bottom time was used up and we made a slow ascent passing a solitary pouting and a scorpion fish to watch blennies as we did out decompression in the shallows.

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A very different dive from Dogfish reef, this was more of the inner loch genre, darker and leading to muddy slopes but with a varied and interesting selection of life.

All in all a good days diving.

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The June DTP at Loch Fyne

It’s a fact of life that the more you put in to something, the more you get out and this was very obvious at this months DTP at Loch Fyne. With the holiday season upon us and with other folk washing their hair Perth_BSAC provided the lion’s share of the instructor and people prepared to muck in and help out. Only fair really as we also took most trainees!

On what can only be described as a fantastic west-coast day with a flat calm sea, warm water and good vis the Perth club had three sessions running. Firstly a drysuit and buoyancy familiarization being led by Chirs and an Ocean diver completing his dive Leader lesson under Steve’s watchful gaze with another buddy pair practicing their navigation and buoyancy within the confines of the bay. One other pair from Dundee were undertaking Sports diver training under Edward Haynes’ watchful gaze.

Leading_a_dive_training

All the hard work was today rewarded with firstly a good session being completed covering drysuits and buoyancy culminating in two exploratory dives where the new skills were put into practice. Steve was set a hard task and asked to teach dive leading to a team consisting of an Ocean Diver and a Dive Leader trainee. By running the Dive leader sessions as examples of best practice our Ocean diver had some of the most comprehensive training for his grade possible. Well done to Steve for his innovative approach, clearly an Advanced Instructor in waiting ! Edward reported varying levels of success with his trainees who struggled with deco stops partly due in part to a poorly fitting drysuit and using skills no longer part of the BSAC syllabus and seldom practiced (never a good idea on an assessment). A greater emphasis will be seen here in upcoming months as BSAC reviews buoyancy skills in training.

completed
All in all a very good event with some good diving and with a diver competing his Ocean Diver practical sessions, a very good result.

thanks to Maureen and Fred for the photos

South Scotland Regional DTP, Loch Fyne, 8th March 2014

It’s not until you step out of your comfort zone and try something a little different that you really appreciate the effort that other people put in. This month the usual organiser had asked me to stand in and run the event, well how hard could that be? I was about to find out.

Preparations starts in earnest about a week before the event with a trickle of notes coming in from people asking to join and as these increase you start to worry about the number of instructors that you have in the pool to assist. You can count on most but illness and other potential commitments sees you phoning each in turn to get that oh so important commitment to show up and coach trainees. A late surge of interest and finally the ’11th hourists’ and we were set with just enough instructors to cover the variety of skills that had been asked for. Of course on the day it never follows the plan!

This month I am very please to report that Perth-BSAC played a lions share in the days events with two instructors, an assistant diving instructor and an assist Dive manager, all of who were key to the days activities. Well done guys!

Having completed the Welcome speech, site brief and allocated trainees to instructors, it was on to the first lesson. Paul went off to start sports diver training with two trainees from Dundee, Hamish practiced his instructional abilities under the watchful gaze of an NQI and while various other groups went about their lessons I supervised a trainee OWI putting Hadyn and another trainees through a weight check and their first dive in the bay area. After an initial shout for more weight we sank into terrible vis which we had to put up with until, basic drills completed, we were able to move into slightly deeper water (3m) where we found the vis actually improved. The stour was an edge effect and in real terms vis was quite good once you got away from the beach. Conscious of the fact this was a first dive for Haydn we didn’t go far or deep just bimbled, looking at crabs, starfish and the other life that we usually take for granted. We ended up doing a clockwise circuit onto the shallow reef to the right of the bay were much to Haydn’s delight and my intense surprise we found a very large and old, admiralty pattern anchor. Next week we will go back and find the rest of the wreck!

After the break and now with Euan performing the role of Assistant Dive manager things flowed more smoothly and the dive slate no longer languished forlornly neglected on the beach. Paul continued with his trainees who both performed well, another great performance there. Hadyn went for a dive along the inner reef seeing some good life including a superb Polycera nudibranch and coming out with a smile broader than his hood.

Some impressive stats on today’s dives but from a club’s perspective some good training delivered, a couple of lessons signed off, a first open water dive and we found a wreck ! (anchors don’t count – Ed!) Many thanks to all the instructors and helpers who made the day possible. Remember the event runs every 2nd Saturday of the month, looking forward to seeing you in April.

Buoyancy and Trim workshop 27th April 2013

This week Steve drove and having been picked up at 07:45 Paul and I enjoyed the chat as we drove across to the Tea Rooms at Loch Fyne for a Buoyancy and Trim Workshop that was being run by Fyne divers.

The day started with a briefing and theory lectures which were delivered in the cafe and while this was going on the shot lines were placed in the bay for the lessons. Found a rather impressive nudibranch (Cadlina laevis) on this dive, not seen one of these on this reef before, lots of Pleurobranchus membranaceus around today with egg whorls but these are getting past their best.

dive one: The first session of the day was where the training was delivered in the form of practice and skills review. Starting at a 6m stop and buddy check and then working on buoyancy. Reaching the shot line we made short ascents and then hovered at the marks on the line. 9m, 6m, 5m, 4m, 3m 2m all saw 2 minute stops and then 30seconds at 1m. Decompression stops can be rather tedious and people hae strategies to alleviate boredom. Today the life in the surface layer, with sea gooseberries and other minute jellyfish and plankton was very pronounced and intriguing.

dive two is the assessment putting into practice what has been learnt on the previous dive or a further fine tuning if any is needed. This time having done our stops we made a vertical descent to hold a 6m stop then continued to just off the bottom before swimming back along the reef where we annoyed a rather sleepy dogfish for a while.

That was it, all that was left was the removal of the shot lines. Alistair and I went in for these and had a slow dive along the inner reef on the way back which gave us the chance to find some interesting life. Three dogfish and a large scorpion fish as well as a friendly Ballan wrasse. All the flat surfaces on the reef were covered in grey fish eggs several dogfish and this short spined scorpion fish.
scorpionfish

With all lessons completed and dives logged we had time for a final coffee and chat where the certificates and log books were signed before being turfed out of the cafe and enjoying the delightful scenery on the way home. Some new faces today and some folk we haven’t seen for a while and hopefully all had fun.

Instructing at Loch Fyne

This Sunday saw one of our club instructors and Budgy a friend from Fyne divers assisting Dundee University SAC on one of their open water training days. Not part of the regional training program, just assisting a local clubs getting its divers through basic training.

An interesting day was spent at the Argyll Caravan Park with some good vis reported but rather cold conditions topside. One successful lesson signed off and a great deal learn form a teaching side. Teaching people that you don’t know is rather different from teaching slowly by osmosis. It polishes the delivery of the BSAC schedule and is very challenging. A highly rewarding activity.

South Scotland Region Diver Training Program, Loch Fyne, 9th March 2013

This month we had another good turn out for the Diver Training Program run by Fyne Divers across at the Team Rooms.

Driving across, Loch Earn looked rough with sizable waves rolling into St Fillans and white caps on the loch at Inveraray so we were not expecting to much from the day. At the Tea rooms the sea was grey and ‘disturbed’, with waves precluding the use of the outer reef but luckily the inner reef and bay area were relatively calm.

Frank took Kim in who reported a very pleasant dive with no ear problems, this was excellent news. (Not sure which if any lesson there was here ?).

Paul had been asked to take Kenny, a student from Fyne Divers for a OS5 lesson and reported no issues, Kenny taking everything in his stride.

Chris took Neil and Kim in to do the OS3 lesson and have fun using a reel to line off from a shot line and simulate a decompression dive. “For the purposes of the exercise we had decided that we were logically at 36m, 20m deeper than we actually were but this meant that the theoretical depth would add a bit realism to our planning (depth,time gas management) and therefore the execution. Having set the shot line up everyone descended and traversed the reef to find a good point to tie off from before venturing out into the bay as we simulated ‘lining off’. Neil lined off, out and back and then Kim repeated the drill. Both sessions encountered low vis and the task loading when monitoring depth, time, gas, bearing, and manipulating a reel and tying knots proved a valuable learning experience. After 45 minutes and the lesson completed we were starting to get a bit cool so debriefed and made good use of the cafe where cake and hot tea were called for.” The ten minutes before getting wet was well spent practicing the drills that were to be used. Ironically conditions were ideal today for this drill, with vis stirred up by the number of divers using the inner reef for training making for somewhat realistic conditions.

Usually we would have done a pleasure dive for the afternoon session giving trainees the chance to practice skills and Paul took Kenny and his shinny new camera in to have some more fun. Kim and Neil were keen to complete SO4 and Chris agreed to take them in to complete another lesson. Once again the dry session was useful, new kit played with and the concepts of distance, time and accuracy while navigating and how to use reciprocal bearings discussed. All seemed simple really. This time the lesson started in the bay and initially surface snorkeled on a bearing before repeating this exercise submerged where, with incredible precision we found the reef! After a short swim, DSMB deployments were followed by a simulated deco stop and then a slow swim back to exit in the corner of the reef.

That was it, apart from a rather nice hot chocolate with marsh mallows and extra cream that had someone smiling, we warmed up in the cafe, had a final social chat before making our way home.

From a club perspective, we had two instructors out , three club trainees and five lessons signed off putting some folk very close to the completion of their next diver grade. Well done everyone. I’d also like to share some feedback from one of the instructors who was highly complimentary about the skills demonstrated by one of our members. It is always nice to receive comments like this as it reflects well on the Perth BSAC club.

No pictures today as I was instructing. Paul may append a few later.

…… Here you go 🙂  Paul

BSAC Diver Training Program. Tea Rooms, Loch Fyne, 9th February 2013

A small team went across to assist with February’s BSAC Diver Training Program at the Loch Fyne Tea Rooms. Steve, Paul and Chris were met there by Kim who was visiting in the area.

Grey overcast but not raining, result! Having got the administration out of the way we set off to deliver our lessons while Kim managed the slate.
Interesting as we were coming off high tide a little rip was apparent in the shallows on the outside of the reef. Once down a few meters is provided a pleasant drift and clearer the water during my lesson.

Today I did DO6 for Claire who turned out to be a confident and proficient trainee from Neptune SAC who demonstrated the achievement criteria with consummate ease. As with all lessons at this venue I always feel I learn as much as the students and today was no exception, what did I learn ? Well don’t make assumptions ! What we do and take for granted, is not necessarily what everyone else is taught and possibly for good reasons as there can be a spill over of technical or professional requirements into what for me is a recreational pastime. Example ? Well my student is required by HSE to always carried a yellow emergency DSMB but would not consider deployment during any training exercise.

Interestingly I once again I had to consider equipment configuration and question what a standard config is for training purposes and why it is important. Left cuff or right cuff dump valves, suit or jacket buoyancy and buckle and clip location as well as cross clipping “Alternate Air Supply” and pony regs into the chest or A-zone. We all do it but do we consider our buddies perspective ?

With the lesson over, Claire and I circumnavigated the reef as part of the exploratory dive part of the exercise. Several large female and berried crabs, some beautifully clean sealoch anemones and several species of blennies and gobbies, not to mention the two small dogfish that we annoyed while putting in our safety stop. Not a bad dive.

That was it for Claire who got rather wet from a cuff leak. After a debrief and a coffee I paired up for a second dive with Alistair from Dundee. This was a recreational dive with Alistair experimenting with the design of a device to encourage birds to swim near him so he could take some photos. Sort of an underwater bird feeder. Regardless of the efficacy of the device it was certainly a bit of fun and well worth the laugh.
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strawberry wormYou can only have some much fun so while Alistair was fine tuning some of the engineering points I started rummaging in the rocks, collecting balls of fishing line. I came across this Strawberry worm looking rather pink and exposed. Food for the wrasse !

Having done thirty minutes of tinkering, Alistair decided his prototyping had achieved what was desired and we were able to continue with the dive.
But what to do ? We didn’t have enough air to complete the circumnavigation of the reef so we opted to swim North East towards the fish farm boom and spend a little time on relatively unexplored terrain. We were lucky enough to come across a swimming nudibranch and then a veritable stampede amongst the rocks

which is an upside down one of these:

nudi