The Meldon & Fish Trap – South of Mull

Steve and I had been planning to do the Meldon for several months now and the opportunity came up.

So Paul, Steve, Gary, Izzy, Mark and Taylor headed out at 9am on Deep Dancer, our Club Rhib, from Puffin Dive Centre near Oban. The trip in good seas takes about 40 minutes and is 15.4 NM, in the morning we had calm seas although we were aware of the Rain and Cloud Forecast for the rest of the day.

Route from Puffin Divers Oban to Meldon15.4 Nautical Miles
Route from Puffin Divers Oban to Meldon – 15.4 Nautical Miles

The Meldon is a great wreck for Novice / Ocean / PADI Open Water divers as there is little or no current on her and she is a relatively intact wreck. The Rudder post breaks the surface at low water and there is lots to see including the Cast Iron Propeller and Rudder, Boilers which are open on the Port Side and the Bow which has fallen over but is very scenic, surprising to see when you consider that she would be exposed to Winter storms from the South.

The Meldon Launched in 1902 at Newcastle is a 1572 Tonne 310 ft Long Steamship, Steel hull construction. On the 3rd of March 1917 while carrying a cargo of Coal from Wales she struck a mine in the Firth of Lorn laid by a German U Boat. The Captain headed for the south Coast of Mull where the Crew got off the boat, she sank with the Stern near the shore, perhaps the Captain thought he could save the ship and was making repairs before a pump failed?

 

Diving the wreck there is broken shell coarse sand around the wreck with plenty of Sugar and Forest Kelp covering her, on the Stern section she has Elegant Anemones and Dead Mans fingers. The Visibility was about 6-8 metres and you could see she is home to Ballan Wrasse and Pollack, this wreck is 300 ft long and towards the bows section she is more broken up. Definitely a pretty and enjoyable wreck, easily covered in one dive and if we’d have had bright sunlight the wreck would have been a lot more colourful too.

We headed further along the coast to Carsaig Quay for a picnic stop, the clouds were low and a steady drizzle coupled with Midges didn’t make this an ideal stop.

Meldon and Fish Trap Dive Sites Marked with Blue Pins
Meldon and Fish Trap Dive Sites Marked with Blue Pins

Although in better weather we would have a chance of spotting Eagles hunting on the Southern Slopes of Mull. We Dived the Fish Trap Just South of Carsaig Quay as a second dive which was a gently sloping reef dropping to sand at 20 metres.  Gary and Izzy found an Octopus on their dive. With the Tide and Swell changing Deep Dancer was slower on the return run to Oban taking about 1.15 minutes. It’s great to get out and find new dive sites.

 

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Drifting through the Gavellachs 

After two weeks of settled Weather, we decided to head out from Oban on Deep Dancer down to the Gavellachs (Islands of the Sea) and try one of the Channels between the Islands.

Usually strong currents provide divers with lots of life to see and we were not let down this time,  however as with all these dives care must be taken to dive them on neaps and close to slack water.

Dropping at the Blue Pin we dropped down to 16 metres and the Viz was about 5-6 metres with lots of Kelp and then Patches of Reef covered in Dead mans Fingers and Elephants Ears Chris and I worked our way round towards the channel where the current picked up condisderably.  We followed the Kelp using it to help keep out of the main current and slow our drift.

Dive Site
Dive Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had heard that the Crawfish were out but didn’t manage to spot any this time.

 

Drift and Wall diving the sound of Luing

With Blue Skies and Calm weather forecast Chris and I had an last minute opportunity for a midweek dive with David Ainsley on his boat the Porpoise II based on the Island of Esdale.  David has been involved the campaign to keep the Firth of Lorn free of Scallop Dredgers and has been recording the recovery of the reefs and Sea bed over the last 7 years since the ban was enforced.

So we were treated to diving on a high energy dive site in the Sound of Luing and a group of three Bottle nosed dolphins who came to greet us as we jumped into the water  – Amazing!  The Slack window on this site was very brief and we descended quickly to 28 metres to find a Reef Covered in Elephants Ear Sponges, Oatan Pipes,  Branched Hydroids, Jewel anemones and Pink variations of the Elegant anemones not seen closer to shore.

After spending a 7 minutes a depth we worked our way back up to the top of the Reef, keeping close to reduce the effect of the 2-3 knot currents and doing a horizontal rock technique not a dive for the inexperienced or faint hearted!  Ducking Behind a large bolder we took a few moments to get some photos before deploying our shot and starting a drift dive, just a pity that the Visibility was only 4-5 metres otherwise this would be an excellent drift dive.

Thansk again to David and Jean for inviting us on this dive trip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dolphins at Insh Island, Easdale: 6th October 2013

06:00 am, What! Another early start ! It’s that time of year when dragging yourself out of bed while it is still dark to go diving is a real test but we did well arriving on time at the club shed to load the boat and set off for Oban. The objective of the day was to firstly get some diving in and to allow Neil to complete his Dive Management practical session.

Plans were a little fluid this weekend with a couple of people coming down with colds and back problems but such was the turn out that we still had a full boat , a good chance to get Deep Dancer out and exercise her engine putting in some time on the water. Of course the first problem was starting the engine which was reticent to say the least, still we are getting very adept and cleaning the plugs, ululating and rending cloth before Paul laid his hands upon the console and she coughed into life. With a boat brief and radio check completed it was time to get the show on the road! So a couple of extra checks to ensure the gear linkage was secure and that we could stop and restart the engine and we were away.

The trip down to Insh Island was rough and Paul did a good job punching his way through a nasty chop to arrive at the northern end of the Island. The small Island and the skerries were not an option today due to the swell and waves but there was sufficient shelter in the little bay to the NE of the Island to allow safe diving. Chris and Euan were first in and found a sandy bottom, good for a few shells but not of great interest. The visibility was reasonable though a fine sand stirred up easily the tide then drifted it with you so you had to continuously move out of the silt trail you raised. The divers found themselves in an eddy and having tried to go south in the direction of the tide eventually gave up and drifted North where the current took them. Towards the end of the dive they reached the reef that joins Insh to the Northern skerries where small walls provided a little interest. Unfortunately the current meant that the dragging an SMB stopped the divers sheltering in the kelp and they surfaced slightly earlier than plan. Mo and Fred went in in a similar place and reported a reasonable dive within the bay, having a good long dive and making a safe ascent. A quick change over on the boat and the dive manager sent the next wave in who followed the edge of the reef taking a few photos and picking up the occasional scallop.

With a full team recovered we decided to head back to Puffin dive center rather than go across to Easdale for lunch as the afternoon was chasing. The trip back proved to be one of the great highlight of our diving this year and goes to show that diving off boats is about the day as much as about time in the water. Half way back the shout went up ‘Dolphin’ and we throttled back to watch. Initially a few animals were surfacing and we weren’t sure how many there were, three or five perhaps. Clearly something was going on and as we watched a tight group started splashing about with much tail waving, a smell of fish suggested they could have been feeding but it was most likely that the smell emanated for the old diver that we keep in the stern of the boat. However the splashing was only the prelude to the main act , dolphins started to jump with supreme grace and it was slight disappointing when the school drifted away from us. With everyone enthralled we set again towards Puffin but the dolphins decided they had not finished with us and started jumping, easily clearing six or even eight feet out of the water. Initially in ones and twos, some right next to the boat and then in synchronized form giving us the kind of show you would have paid top dollar for in Orlando. Here it was off the West coast for free !

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A much easier passage back to Puffin followed, with a following wind we made better time and having secured the boat spent a leisurely hours over lunch, ‘grilling’ the Dive Manager on his theory (he he he he!).

Ardnachuil bay was the next site, a short ride from Puffin and while not calm, a safe option. Chris and Euan were in first and having bushwacked their way through the swell and the kelp, found a sand and gravel slope disappearing off into the depth. Chris reported a couple nudibranchs with dendronotus-lacteus and it’s brilliant white body easily spotted standing out on a brown kelp frond and being a new one for him. (No camera today so I’ve included a link from the Scottish nudibranch site – Ed) later in the dive, they also found a small red sea hare, perhaps the smallest one, you could possibly imagine being less than half a centimeter long. Mo and Fred reported a short dive, struggling to get out of the kelp in the challenging swell they encountered. A good effort in challenging conditions and as it had a safe outcome merits a success in my books.

With the second wave of divers in the water, the opportunity for a bit of boat handling skills development was presented and man over board and indeed board overboard skills were practiced before standing on station over the divers waiting for them to surface. Paul and Steve surfaced and having had a stern debriefing from the Dive Manger they were allowed onboard before we departed for Puffin. Well done to the Dive manager there for demonstrating control over the group! The boat was recovered and kit washed down on the slip and with a final debrief from Neil the day was wound up with the boat heading off to the club store followed by Chris and Euan.

Congratulation go to Neil for successfully completing his Dive Manager practical as part of his Sports Diver grade training, he did exceptionally well keeping control over some experienced divers with an accumulation of years of bad habits. The committee have yet to validate his qualification level but I look forward to diving with our newest qualified Sports Diver in the not too distant future.

Thanks to Steve for organising another successful days diving and to Paul for towing Deep Dancer.

Photos Added PS